September 19, 2017 Articles

Is Your Child Being Bullied?

Signs your child may be a victim of bullying

Bullying has always been a part of social interaction and continues to be a cause of concern for parents and educators today. While most people think that bullying is limited to the school setting, all of us experience bullying throughout our entire lives. An important part of educating our children should include learning the social skills necessary to minimize bullying and negate the potential negative effects that can result.

The first step to helping our children deal with bullying situations is to recognize when they may be occurring. The following lists will help you know it’s time to start discussions with your child about possible bullying going on in their life.

The Warning Signs:

  1. Shows an abrupt lack of interest in school, or refuses to go to school.
  2. Takes an unusual route to school.
  3. Suffers a drop in grades.
  4. Withdraws from family and school activities.
  5. Is hungry after school.
  6. Steals money from home.
  7. Makes a beeline to the bathroom when arriving home.
  8. Is sad, sullen, angry or scared after receiving a phone call or e-mail.
  9. Does something out of character.
  10. Has torn or missing clothing.
  11. Uses derogatory or demeaning language when talking about peers.
  12. Stops talking about peers and everyday activities.
  13. Has physical injuries not consistent with explanation.
  14. Has stomach aches, headaches, panic attacks, is unable to sleep, sleeps too much, is exhausted.
  15. Plays alone or prefers to hang out with adults.

Hopefully you have developed an open relationship with your child where they feel comfortable discussing various topics in an open and honest way. Even so, your child may not be forthcoming right away if they have been targeted by a bully. Understanding the reasons why will help you bring up the topic with your child.

Why kids don’t tell:

  1. They are ashamed of being bullied.
  2. They are afraid of retaliation.
  3. They don’t think anyone can help them.
  4. They don’t think anyone will help them.
  5. They are afraid of being labelled a “rat” or a tattler.
  6. They are afraid that adult involvement will result in the bullying becoming worse.

With this knowledge, you will be better prepared to support your child should they require advice or assistance in dealing with bullying situations.

For resources on strategies to help children (and adults) stop feeling like victims of bullying, please contact Scott Bullard at Canada’s Best Karate at 905.879.8008 or email him directly at sensei1@canadasbestkarate.ca

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